Wednesday
Dec072011

In our Summer issue I wrote my opening letter from the publisher 

 

 LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER 

Fields Jackson, Jr  


DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION - DO YOU KNOW WHO IS ON YOUR TEAM?

I have recently accepted an adjunct professor position with Chicago State University, Chicago, Illinois http://www.csu.edu- where I will be teaching an on-line undergraduate business course - MKTG 3705 – ENTREPRENEURIAL SALES & MARKETING. I am excited about this opportunity and will use this course to discuss the impact of social media on business and communities.

My goal is to develop a case study - that will be picked up by blogs, magazines and other business schools around the country, as a training tool for the new social media realities and how they intersect with diversity and inclusion. With all the focus on customers, strategy, execution etc... it leaves one key question. Do you know who is on your social media team within your organization?

 My first class at Chicago state is coming to an end.  As part of their final assignment I asked my students to write 200 word paper on what have you learned about social media and what do you plan to do with your personal brand - Twitter page or Facebook page. 

With the help of Tasha Strickland, my executive assistant we have picked the top three papers

 

Here is paper # 2

 Ramoul Glispie

11/30/2011

Chicago State University

Marketing 3705

I have learned that social media can be a great marketing tool especially for entrepreneurs or smalls businesses who cannot afford the traditional way of marketing. It gives potential customers the ability to connect with business owner’s personal brand. Social media also acts as a review hub, giving the consumer the ability to leave honest feedback on your brand/product. In addition consumers can also learn more about your brand/product through social media. Such as, location, in-depth details, reviews, comments and contact information.

 The way I would use social media to my advantage would be to market my personal brand via social media cites. To navigate people to my social cites I would setup contest for my target audience. Facebook contest would consist of the first one hundred people who like my business would receive a half off coupon for their purchase. The contest would be the same for the Twitter followers. Once I am linked to them I would then begin to feed information through my social media links, such as menus or specials that arise throughout the year. In addition to Facebook and Twitter, I would create viral videos that give actual customer testimonies on how good their experience was at my establishment.

 Overall I have learned that social media may be the most powerful free marketing a business could have.

 

 

Wednesday
Dec072011

In our Summer issue I wrote my opening letter from the publisher

 

  

LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER 
Fields Jackson, Jr  


DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION - DO YOU KNOW WHO IS ON YOUR TEAM?

I have recently accepted an adjunct professor position with Chicago State University, Chicago, Illinois http://www.csu.edu - where I will be teaching an on-line undergraduate business course - MKTG 3705 – ENTREPRENEURIAL SALES & MARKETING. I am excited about this opportunity and will use this course to discuss the impact of social media on business and communities.

My goal is to develop a case study - that will be picked up by blogs, magazines and other business schools around the country, as a training tool for the new social media realities and how they intersect with diversity and inclusion. With all the focus on customers, strategy, execution etc... it leaves one key question. Do you know who is on your social media team within your organization?

 My first class at Chicago state is coming to an end.  As part of their final assignment I asked my students to write 200 word paper on what have you learned about social media and what do you plan to do with your personal brand - Twitter page or Facebook page. 

With the help of Tasha Strickland, my executive assistant we have picked the top three papers 

 

Here is paper # 3

 Steven E. Thomas

Week 15 - Assignment 

I have learned the true importance of social networking and establishing a solid business plan.  I have also learned what it means to start, run and prosper in a business.  The two interviews that I did were eye opening and so very informative.   The passion for their endeavors was phenomenal.  Even the two businesses differ in their use of social media, they each shared some of the same principals of success.   I have subsequently started working much more diligently on my current web site (www.calumetcitybaseball.com) and attaching my Facebook page at the same name aggressively.  Currently I am working on a request for proposal for the Calumet City Little League to be the primary photographer for them.  I have a better understanding on blogging and the importance of user generated content means through the following of Twitter and Facebook. 

 My ultimate goal is to be successful in a multimedia field, such as an online newsletter for Veterans to keep them in the loop about any changes in policies and give them the ability to link to existing services.  With a strong emphasis on counseling and housing for disabled veterans who have a high rate of being homeless.  I believe that if I can establish a good set of social skills through the use of  the vast amount of social networks, I will make a difference.

 

 

Tuesday
Nov222011

Getting ready with PISA’s new module on financial literacy 

Anna LusardiI am turning in this blog post to the new financial literacy module that will be added to the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2012. PISA’s group of financial literacy experts met in Melbourne at the end of September and finalized the questions that will be asked of 15-year-old high school students in 18 countries. I wrote about this module in a previous post (see link below) and it is time for an update.

I have the honor of chairing the financial literacy experts group, and an honor it is because the group is composed of some of the most accomplished and knowledgeable people in the field of financial literacy from a number of countries. Because the importance of financial literacy was first acknowledged outside the school system and was first dealt with by policy makers and regulators, many of these experts come from Treasury departments or hold jobs in central banks, regulatory authorities, or are involved with other government agencies. Nonetheless, the work has been academic in nature, meaning we went through a very rigorous process of designing a set of questions that can measure financial literacy in many different countries.

Our first task was to design a financial literacy framework to help us define the objectives of the module and the areas to cover when designing questions (The framework can be accessed on the OECD web site—the link is below). The development of the framework followed a sequence of six steps:
• Development of a working definition for the domain and description of the assumptions that underlie that definition;
• Identification of a set of key characteristics that should be taken into account when constructing assessment tasks for international use;
• Operationalization of the set of key characteristics that will be used in test construction, with definitions based on existing literature and experience in conducting other large scale assessments;
• Evaluation of how to organise the set of tasks constructed in order to report to policy makers and researchers on achievement in each assessment domain among 15-year-old students in participating countries;
• Validation of the variables and assessment of the contribution each makes to understanding task difficulty across the various participating countries; and
• Preparation of an interpretative reporting scheme for the results.

It was a long journey for all of us. We started this work in June 2010 with a meeting in Boston and we worked steadily for a year and a half. We met at regular intervals, each time in a different country, which also reminded us that our focus was to design questions that could be answered in different economic settings and different educational systems.

The OECD has been a pioneer in financial literacy and adding a new module on financial literacy in 2012 in PISA in countries that have not even formally introduced financial education in school speaks of their long-term vision and their capacity to lead and draw the attention of countries toward important topics such as financial literacy. I particularly like the statement that the OECD displays on the top of their PISA webpage:

“Are students well prepared for future challenges? Can they analyse, reason and communicate effectively? Do they have the capacity to continue learning throughout life? The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) answers these questions and more, through its surveys of 15-year-olds in the principal industrialised countries. Every three years, it assesses how far students near the end of compulsory education have acquired some of the knowledge and skills essential for full participation in society.”

This statement serves to remind us that financial education is as important as the traditional subjects taught in school: As I have mentioned often, just as it was not possible to live in an industrialized society without print literacy—the ability to read and write, so it is not possible to live in today’s world without being financially literate. The financial crisis has put economic news on the front pages of newspapers almost daily, requiring individuals not just to be abreast of concepts such as deficit, national debt, and interest rate spread but also to evaluate the economic reforms that political leaders are proposing. Not only are young people required to make one of the most important decisions of their lifetime— whether to invest in higher education—during high school, but they are also confronted with numerous decisions of economic consequence: having a car, a cell phone contract, a bank account, and a debit or credit card. Financial literacy is an essential tool for anyone who wants to be able to succeed in today’s society, make sound financial decisions, and—ultimately—be a good citizen.

We, on the PISA committee, are only at the beginning of our journey. Our next meeting has been scheduled for Heidelberg, Germany, next September, so we fly to yet another country. I have collected little items from those trips to remind me of our meetings. From our trip in Australia, I brought home a little yellow road sign that hangs in my study. It says: “Kangaroos, next 15 km.”

To read the financial literacy framework, please see below:
http://www.pisa.oecd.org/dataoecd/8/43/46962580.pdf
My previous blog on PISA:
http://annalusardi.blogspot.com/2010/09/comparing-financial-literacy-of-young.html

Tuesday
Nov222011

Group O Recognized as 2011 National Minority Supplier of the Year

MILAN, Illinois – November 9, 2011: The National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC®) has recognized Group O as its 2011 National Minority Supplier of the Year in the category of companies with annual sales of $50 million or more. Group O Founder and Chairman Bob Ontiveros accepted the award at NMSDC’s annual conference in Atlanta. 
 
“The measure of success in the global business environment is changing rapidly and business service providers like Group O must continue to innovate and offer differentiated solutions,” said Gregg Ontiveros, CEO of Group O. “NMSDC is a leader in helping diverse suppliers work toward that vision and we’re honored to receive this recognition.” 
 
In October, NMSDC recognized Group O among 16 regional winners. These companies were nominated by their corporate customers and divided into four classes based on annual sales. The award selection process evaluated the nominees based on business growth, development and performance, community service, and the ability to overcome challenges associated with the company owner’s heritage or background. 
 
“Under the leadership of Robert Ontiveros, Group O has evolved into one of the largest Hispanic-owned firms in the U.S.,” said NMSDC President Joset Wright. “For nearly four decades, the company has grown steadily in size and capacity, and adjusted to meet the changing needs of its corporate customers. Its business success and support of the local community make it an excellent choice for our Class IV National Supplier of the Year.” 
 
About NMSDC Providing a direct link between corporate America and minority-owned businesses is the primary objective of the National Minority Supplier Development Council, one of the country’s leading business membership organizations. It was chartered in 1972 to provide increased procurement and business opportunities for minority businesses of all sizes. The NMSDC Network includes a national office in New York and 37 Regional Councils across the country. There are 3,500 corporate members throughout the network, including America’s top publicly owned, privately owned and foreign-owned companies as well as universities, hospitals and other buying institutions. The Regional Councils certify 
and match 16,000 minority-owned businesses with member corporations that want to purchase their goods and services. For more information, visit www.NMSDC.org. 
 
About Group O Group O is a diversified service provider with solutions that optimize its clients’ marketing execution, supply chain operations and strategic packaging needs. The company’s Marketing Solutions group offers a full range of relevant loyalty and incentive programs, managed services staffing and full-capacity call center solutions, efficient consumer and trade fulfillment, and direct mail and print optimization services. The Supply Chain Solutions group serves the heavy equipment and high-tech sectors with serialized, high-velocity and scalable forward- and reverse-logistics services, as 
well as strategic sourcing and procurement solutions. The Packaging Solutions group provides an extensive nationwide network of packaging materials, equipment, analytical and service offerings. Group O is ISO 9001:2008 and TL 9000-certified, and SAS 70 Type II-compliant. Headquartered in Milan, Illinois, Group O is the ninth-largest Hispanic-owned company in the United States and employs more than 1,500 employees. To learn more, visit www.GroupO.com. 
 
Contact: Alfred Ramirez 
Vice President, Government Relations & Diversity 
Group O 
309 736-8179 office 
202 257-4419 mobile 
Alfred.Ramirez@groupo.com        ### 

4905 77th Avenue | Milan, IL 61264