Monday
Jul082019

A PROFITABLE PARTNERSHIP: HBCUs AND U.S. CORPORATIONS

 

 

By Alicia Jackson,1 Isaac McCoy,2 Anthony Nelson,3 Joe Ricks,4 Van Sapp,5 Fatemeh Zakery6 

Conversations at the HBCU Business Deans Roundtable and subsequent in-depth interviews with deans have identified concrete ways that HBCU-corporate partnerships can empower everyone – companies, institutions, and students – to achieve greater success. HBCU graduates are the workers that corporations seek, and corporations have the resources and skills to elevate the quality of those graduates. 

“Corporations are in the business of acquiring and retaining the talent,” says Dean Anthony Nelson of the Business School at North Carolina Central University. “We’re in the business of producing that talent. It’s beneficial for both of these to take the time to communicate so we can do a good job of producing that talent, so they can do a good job of acquiring and retaining that talent.” 

HBCUs can provide a certain kind of worker with a background, both before and during college, that enhances organizational and team diversity. Graduates of smaller HBCUs and larger HBCUs – there are 111 HBCUs nationally of different sizes, histories, and specialties – bring different dimensions of diversity and opportunity. Smaller campuses, for example, typically have closer faculty-student relationships, and faculty can help companies identify particular graduates most likely to succeed in the firm’s environment. 

Education at an HBCU provides more opportunities for minorities than education of minorities at TWIs. This includes multiple leadership roles in teams, clubs, organizations, volunteer projects, and a host of other activities early in their academic career that develop an agile entrepreneurial mindset. 

“Students design, create, implement, and evaluate a lot earlier and more often in their academic career at smaller institutions,” says Dean Isaac McCoy of the Stillman College School of Business. “We need all talent at the table so students’ talents, skills, and abilities are identified and honed as soon as they step foot on campus.” 

It also includes a different kind of classroom experience, where conversations that touch on the black experience in America happen in a more shared and mutually-understood context. It might include a greater faculty-student mentoring relationship. Black students will engage people who look like them, both as classmates and as professors, more than they would in other institutions. At the same time, it will likely reveal the breadth of diversity within the black community itself, a vital experience for every individual who will work in a broader and more diverse environment. Many students come to an HBCU with the assumption that their own experience in their community and high school is “the black experience,” and they discover the wide variety of definitions covered by that term. This revelation instills a deeper appreciation for difference and inclusion that accelerates the transition into workplace environments where they may not be in the majority. 

These soft skills and diversity contributions are not a substitute for relevant, rigorous skills training and expertise in the student’s field. In the present environment, up-to-date classroom training is necessary but not sufficient – students, even in their early years, must gain real-world experience where they see the powerful impact of knowledge and how to bring it about. This can happen both on campus and in the workplaces of partner organizations who benefit from the students’ meaningful participation in their projects, problem-solving, and discovery. 

In order to ensure that the classroom training is effective, students need teachers who are on the leading edge of the field teaching courses that prepare them for the real demands of workplace, both hard and soft skills. This includes both their traditional faculty and visiting faculty who are working practitioners. Faculty as well as students need exposure to the realities of the contemporary workplace through in-person participation, mentoring, and other opportunities for learning. Visiting lecturers and short- or long-term executives-in-residence on campus can enhance both individuals’ knowledge and curriculum content. 

“Sometimes we as academicians tend to get so deeply involved in knowledge-based teaching and research that we tend to become disconnected with the practical aspect of our profession,” says Dean Fatemeh Zakery of the Anheuser-Busch School of Business at Harris-Stowe State University. “What if we had a corporate executive resident from corporations like Google, Facebook or Amazon to spend a week, a month or a semester on our campuses? A corporate resident could teach a seminar course as a professor; interact and consult with faculty and students on a daily basis on various relevant business issues; conduct workshops for students on various topics including how to use skills they acquired in school to successfully navigate job market and how to adapt, manage diversity, lead well within any corporate setting and serve on business schools’ advisory boards. 

Hands-on faculty experience inside corporations can equip professors to bring real industry needs to the classroom for students. Dean Joe Ricks of the Division of Business at Xavier University in Louisiana had three internships at 3M through its Frontline program during his academic career. The relationship has generated one or two hires of Xavier business graduates a year by 3M since 2001 – a small annual number that adds up over the years. Another way HBCUs and corporations can partner to engage faculty and industry leaders is through dedicated agenda time during industry meetings and academic conferences. At these meetings faculty and hiring managers can learn from being immersed into each other’s world and have set meetings for planning, implementing, and evaluating faculty development and pipeline plans and initiatives. 

This education requires sophisticated infrastructure, including state-of-the-art technology and support. Many individual HBCUs lack sufficient resources to invest in such infrastructure. Some seek to solve the problem with collaborations among HBCUs or TWIs, but often the most effective partnership is with corporations. 

“We do have limited access to what’s new and up-and-coming in the corporate world,” says Dean Alicia Jackson of the Albany State University College of Business in southwest Georgia. “I think my faculty could benefit from spending a summer, for example, with a company in their specific area and finding out what’s really going on…to gain some more background on these topical areas they could turn around and share with their students.” Because many faculty depend on teaching summer classes to earn money, the program would need financial support to be feasible. 

Corporations seeking to establish deeper relationships will get better results by approaching deans rather than presidents. They might offer executives to serve on advisory boards, help develop curriculum, and give lectures and workshops as well as provide executives-in-residence and student and faculty internships and mentoring. They might visit classrooms and dining halls or rent campus facilities for board meetings and team meetings so that they establish a presence and opportunities for serendipitous encounters that will give them a fuller perspective on students than career fairs, where students best able at selling themselves in such an environment might not be the best fit for the company. 

“Like all your recruiting, you have to form some relationship to get the best talent for your organization,” says Dean Van Sapp of the School of Business, Management & Technology at St. Augustine’s College, who suggests both deans and professional development officers as effective connections. “Make sure have a link with the people who are producing the product rather than just the people who are selling the product. “Spend time and effort to create the relationship.” 

 

About the HBCU Business Deans Roundtable

 

HBCU Business Deans represent 83 campuses in 22 states and the Virgin Islands with more than 250,000 students enrolled. 

Mission: The purpose of this organization is to provide a forum for deans of HBCU business schools to address opportunities and challenges associated with enhancing business programs and initiatives. The organization also seeks to strengthen and develop strategic partnerships and alliances with corporations, government, and national organizations to provide the essential tools and resources for student success.

 

 

1 Dean, Albany State University College of Business.

2 Dean, Stillman College School of Business.

3 Dean, Business School, N.C. Central University.

4 Dean, Xavier University of Louisiana Division of Business.

5 Dean, St. Augustine’s College School of Business, Management & Technology.

6 Dean, Harris-Stowe State University Anheuser-Busch School of Business.

 

Monday
Jul082019

CONNECTION WITH CORPORATIONS: STRATEGIES FOR HBCUs

 

By Alicia Jackson,1 Isaac McCoy,2 Anthony Nelson,3 Joe Ricks,4 Van Sapp,5 Fatemeh Zakery6

Conversations at the HBCU Business Deans Roundtable and subsequent in-depth interviews with deans have identified concrete ways that HBCU business schools can elevate relationships with corporations for the sake of their graduates’ success. They must promote the specific benefits of the relationship for the corporation, identify the specific needs to be addressed, and create easy-access structures for meaningful impact on the institution and its students. An all-of-the-above approach will include each school’s highlighting its particular advantages (e.g., closer faculty-student relationships at smaller institutions); a unified message about the benefits of hiring HBCU graduates in general; and partnerships with each other, Traditional White Institutions (TWIs), and corporations to secure necessary expertise and resources. The partnerships with corporations can include hands-on student and faculty experiences in the business; executive visits, talks, and in-residence terms on campus; advisory boards for curriculum and other issues; shared programs and infrastructure; and participation in industry meetings and academic conferences (see white paper for corporations). 

The message elevates the high-value returns that corporations can expect from partnering with HBCUs. The approach to corporations, unlike the approach to philanthropists, can be framed as an attractive business investment rather than charity. It should highlight the institute’s assets first, rather than its needs. 

“We think in terms of a charity state of mind,” says Dean Isaac McCoy of the Stillman College School of Business. “The assets of a HBCU and its graduates, not their deficits or gaps, must prevail when communicating return on investment (ROI) to corporate partners.” 

Those assets include the diversity that HBCU graduates can bring to corporations, both generally and specific to each institution. (They also include the institution’s faculty, staff, and facilities such as meeting space.) This message, however, must highlight not only the social, cultural, economic, and racial diversity of graduates but also the rigorous training, depth of knowledge, and high-value expertise in the field that they have acquired through their HBCU education. Success depends not on soft skills alone. Graduates must have demonstrable hard skills ready for the workforce today – and partnerships with corporations can help guarantee those skills through faculty and curriculum development as well as experiential learning and networking opportunities for students. 

Leading-edge faculty expertise is vital. Academic knowledge is necessary but not sufficient for the professor as well as for the student. Students must see that their teachers understand and engage in modern business practices, including social media. Keeping faculty, and therefore curriculum, up-to-date is a natural access point for engaging corporations. Programs such as faculty internships in partners’ businesses are a win-win, with the corporation gaining the professor’s wisdom and the professor gaining the practical experience of today’s workforce. Executive-in-residence programs give both students and faculty access to the business leader’s insights and mentoring. The traditional divide between academics and practitioners must be replaced by mutual understanding, respect, and commitment to the good of the students and the greater society. Breaking down those barriers and participating in creating the broader experience that modern students expect from college should be part of the metrics that can help a professor’s career advance. 

“It allows corporations to use different muscles for some of their executives,” says Dean Van Sapp of the School of Business, Management & Technology at St. Augustine’s College. “It’s like a workout. Doing the same thing all the time is not going to be effective. This environment helps them not only flex those muscles, but it shows the business schools what’s really key. The employee gets a big benefit at reasonable cost.” 

Experiential learning for students is indispensable. Internships empower students to see the impact of their learning applied to real-time problems, making them more eager to master concepts in the classroom – they already have the answer to “what am I going to do with this?” Internships provide an opportunity to test abstract career goals in the real world, sometimes confirming a path and sometimes revealing the wisdom of changing course. At the same time, HBCUs should elevate awareness of the multiple leadership experiences that their students experience on campus and in their personal lives, especially those at small colleges where everyone manages several roles. Those instill a sought-after entrepreneurial mindset more valuable than a GPA. 

“We need to prepare students with soft skills, technical skills, experiential learning, cultural awareness of what they’re going to be faced with when they leave academia and go into a corporation,” says Dean Anthony Nelson of the Business School at North Carolina Central University. “It can’t start in the junior or senior year. It has to start with the freshmen. It could even happen as early as high school, developing those relationships. I think industry and academia can join together in preparing those high school students for college and preparing those college students for the corporate world.”

A partnership between Harris-Stowe State University and neighboring Wells Fargo Advisors created a successful academia-corporate partnership model that could be replicated with the school’s other business partners. The partnership entails many collaborative projects to achieve a common goal of graduating students as potential applicants, including bank officials on the advisory board and engaging with students, a bank-sponsored Trading Room, and a semester-long internship that ends with students presenting their consulting projects for feedback. “I do not miss any of those presentations because it is so rewarding to watch how we and corporations join forces in growing, grooming and graduating interns that can smoothly transition into work ace,” says Dean Fatemeh Zakery of the Anheuser-Busch School of Business at Harris-Stowe State University, adding that many of these interns get hired by Wells Fargo. Students use skills to succeed in landing careers and thrive in a diverse corporate environment. 

HBCUs must create corporate partnerships and encourage their faculty and students to engage those partnerships when they arise, for their own sake and for the institution’s long-term relationships. 

“It’s up to us to motivate our faculty,” says Dean Alicia Jackson of the Albany State University College of Business. “They have to disrupt their lives and go someplace out of town. Motivating our faculty and our students to take advantage of these opportunities when they come along is something we have got to do – ‘Faculty, you have things you need to learn, and this is going to beneficial to you.’” 

For HBCUs, success at student placement is necessary but not sufficient. Many HBCU graduates get sought-after jobs only to leave them after less than two years, often to start their own business, join a smaller company, or change fields. Retention of minority employees is a significant problem for corporations. To generate evidence of their benefit – and alerts for needed changes – HBCUs must develop thorough and meaningful ways to track students’ careers after graduation. 

Six years ago, a business communications class at Xavier University in Louisiana started requiring students to create a LinkedIn profile. Most students updated their profiles, says Dean Joe Ricks of the Division of Business, adding that the site reveals 90 percent have gotten jobs over the past two years. Eighty-eight percent of those got jobs in their major or a business-related field, and almost all of the others were athletes who had gone into coaching. One student got a job after Microsoft contacted her through the profile.

 

About the HBCU Business Deans Roundtable

 

HBCU Business Deans represent 83 campuses in 22 states and the Virgin Islands with more than 250,000 students enrolled. 

Mission: The purpose of this organization is to provide a forum for deans of HBCU business schools to address opportunities and challenges associated with enhancing business programs and initiatives. The organization also seeks to strengthen and develop strategic partnerships and alliances with corporations, government, and national organizations to provide the essential tools and resources for student success.

 

 

1 Dean, Albany State University College of Business.

2 Dean, Stillman College School of Business.

3 Dean, Business School, N.C. Central University.

4 Dean, Xavier University in Louisiana Division of Business.

5 Dean, St. Augustine’s College School of Business, Management & Technology.

6 Dean, Harris-Stowe State University Anheuser-Busch School of Business.

 

Wednesday
Jun262019

Career Opportunities - Los Angeles, Oakland and Rosemead, Calif.

Bill Imada

 
Cerrell
Account Executive, Public Relations and Crisis Communications
Los Angeles
 
From Mr. Hal Dash, Chairman and CEO, Cerrell.
 
Position Overview
In today’s media environment, every business, government entity, and non-profit organization needs to work with the 24-hour news cycle. Cerrell’s Public Relations and Crisis Communications team is looking for an eager and aggressive media professional to join our team of experienced, creative, and innovative practitioners, to work with us to develop comprehensive PR campaigns and compelling content to shift public opinion, mitigate crisis situations, influence stakeholders, and make news.
 
Cerrell is California’s senior public affairs firm specializing in local government, campaigns, issues management, media relations and crisis communications. Interested parties are encouraged to visit our website at www.cerrell.com and send their resume, cover letter and three writing samples to jobs@cerrell.com.
 
Account Executive (AE)
Account Executives are responsible for managing day-to-day client needs. AE’s handle proactive/reactive contact among a broader group of community, government and media and have an increased client interface. We are seeking a creative and innovative thinker who can proactively offer and implement new ways to meet clients’ communications needs.
 
AE’s must possess strong written, social media and verbal communication skills, and are expected to have considerable knowledge of various industries and public policies issues. The ideal candidate must demonstrate good strategic thinking. AE’s typically have two to three years of public affairs, communications, government or related experience.
 
Responsibilities
• Develop and edit compelling and high-quality deliverables, including plans, memos, research, written content, media materials, website and social media content, client correspondence, and collateral
• Play a pivotal role in managing day-to-day client communications’ needs
• Handle proactive/reactive communication tasks for clients that need assistance with community groups, government and media outreach
• Actively participate in the development of communications and social media plans and their execution
• Provide appropriate instruction to junior staff on projects and facilitate teamwork
• Monitor client budgets and measure time allocations against budgets
 
Key Qualifications
• Minimum 2-4 years of communications experience in an agency setting, government or related communications experience.
• Expected to have considerable knowledge of various public policy and business issues, and must demonstrate good strategic thinking (experience working in the healthcare, real estate development and transportation sectors are a plus).
• Must possess extremely strong written and verbal communication skills, with experience to translating complex information into lay language.
• Energetic, self-starter and resourceful problem solver – gets things moving and keeps them on track. High attention to detail, with the ability to manage multiple ongoing activities.
• Team player who’s willing and able to collaborate closely with colleagues and clients.
• Be able to balance tasks and prioritize work, meet deadlines, actively communicate progress and deliverables.
 
Pay
Position is full-time and provides competitive salary depending on experience. Cerrell offers an excellent benefits package including medical, long-term disability, 401(k) plan with employer matching, performance bonuses and more.
We are an equal opportunity employer and considers all qualified applicants regardless of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, gender, pregnancy, age over 40, physical or mental disability, veteran or military status, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, registered domestic partner status or any other basis prohibited by applicable law. Cerrell will consider for employment qualified applicants with a criminal history consistent with the requirements of the Los Angeles Fair Chance Initiative for Hiring Ordinance.
 
Not accepting submissions from job agencies.
 
 
 
Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC)
Manager, Western Region
Oakland, Calif.
 
From Ms. Reyna Del Haro, Director of Public Affairs and Brand Communications, Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park Medical Center.
 
Overview 
The Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC) is a national not-for-profit organization founded in 1994 by Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter to promote economic development in America’s inner cities through private sector engagement that leads to the creation of jobs, income and wealth for local residents. Informed by our research, ICIC has developed or supported highly effective initiatives for underserved urban businesses to meet entrepreneurs’ most pressing needs. At ICIC, you will work with talented, creative and committed professionals in a collaborative culture dedicated to excellence and innovation.
 
Position Description 
The Western Region Manager is the representative of the Inner City Capital Connections (ICCC) program and of ICIC on the West Coast. The ICCC program helps business owners in economically distressed areas build capacity for sustainable growth in revenue, profitability, and employment. It is the only program of its kind to provide capacity-building education, one-on-one coaching, and connections to capital and capital providers. Currently offered in 14 US markets, the program is designed for busy executives of all expertise levels and helps bridge the gap for the 70% of inner city businesses that are dramatically undercapitalized.
 
Job Description 
This role is the lead in managing the growing relationship with our sponsor Kaiser Permanente (KP) and in building networks of partners to refer qualified candidates for the ICCC program.
 
The primary responsibilities of the role include:
 
Relationship & Project Management 
  • Act as the main liaison between ICCC and Kaiser Permanente stakeholders in various geographies.
  • Manage periodic reporting to KP, including during planning and execution of programs in different cities.
  • Work with KP leadership to ensure successful delivery of program in a manner consistent with local needs and ICIC resources.
  • Manage the creation and delivery of special projects.
 
Small Business Recruitment & Partnership Development 
  • Introduce ICIC and the ICCC program to potential partners both at a national and local level.
  • Develop new recruitment relationships in specific markets alongside program partners.
  • Work closely with the ICCC team and nominating partners to ensure sufficient quality nominations to create successful cohorts in each city.
  • Represent ICCC and ICIC at various meetings, events, and speaking engagements across geographies, especially in the West Coast.
 
Qualifications: Candidates must demonstrate experience working independently but in close cooperation with a remote team. He/she must be comfortable interacting with people at all levels of an organization and influencing decisions at a high level.
  • Minimum of 4 years professional experience. Advanced degree in business, marketing, or similar field preferred
  • Proven success in building and maintaining client relationships
  • Experience managing multiple constituents and projects at the same time, flexibility with changing priorities
  • Ability to work well with a team as well as individually
  • Strong written and oral communication skills
  • Strong problem solving and organizational skills and attention to detail
  • Able to travel approximately 4-5 days per month.
 
ICIC is dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse and inclusive organization and strongly encourages applications from minorities. We provide equal opportunity for all persons seeking employment without regard to race, age, color, religion, gender identity, family status, sexual orientation, military status, national origin, disability, or any other characteristic as established by law.
 
This is a remote, full-time position working independently from home on the West Coast, reporting to the Director of the ICCC program.
 
Application Details 
To be considered for this position, please submit your resume and cover letter through our application page.
 
For more information and to apply, contact: Mr. Diego Portillo Mazal
 
 
Southern California Edison
Senior Advisor, Corporate Philanthropy
Rosemead, Calif.
 
From Ms. Tammy Tran, Senior Manager for Community Engagement, Local Public Affairs, Southern California Edison.
 
Job Description
Corporate Communications is comprised of many groups, including Brand & Advertising, Creative Services, Corporate Giving, Key Initiatives, Emerging Issues and Digital & Social Media. Our primary responsibility is to keep our various stakeholders informed about all manner of vital company news/information, ranging from the hyper-urgent (such as storms/widespread power outages) to the not-so-urgent-but-still-essential (such as how to be more energy efficient).
 
The job…..
 
You will be responsible for developing and implementing the goals and programmatic needs related to the company’s charitable contributions strategic plan to result in increasing the company’s brand in the areas of corporate citizenship and improving business relationships with nonprofit organizations, community-based organizations and educational institution across the company’s service territory and reports to the Principal Manager of Corporate Philanthropy in Corporate Communications.
 
You will manage long-term projects and charitable investments and will lead measurement and evaluation methods, benchmarking and efforts that allows for the assessment of performance, trends, impact, and data driven decisions. Responsibilities also include benchmarking and reporting as well as planning and forecasting ~$6 million in budgets and resources.
 
You will provide strategic counsel to senior level leaders, employees and communicators to enhance existing philanthropic programs, collaborate with internal Organization Units to assess needs and develop recommendations, engage employees in giving back, support communities throughout the service territory and increase the company’s brand and reputation as a corporate citizen and leader.
 
Detailed stuff you’ll be doing..
  • Review, analyze and make recommendations on grant proposals, project/program outcomes, governance structure, evaluation/measurements and financial statements.
  • Monitor grant investments and serve as a primary contact for grantees in the portfolio, along with key community partners, nonprofit networks and funders to strengthen organizational capacity of grantees and sector.
  • Develop and implement strategic plans and provides strategic counsel to senior leaders, employees and communicators to enhance existing grantmaking efforts and increase company reputation and presence through nonprofit board placements and initiating, maintaining and enhancing relationships with external stakeholders.
  • Lead the assessment of data, metrics, evaluation, and impact reporting related to the implementation of the charitable contributions strategic plan.
  • Summarize and interpret data and is responsible for reports and presentations describing outcomes and methods used.
  • Manage key projects by developing, implementing and managing project teams, program charters, project plans, communications plans, budget management and lessons learned to ensure all work is completed within scope.
  • Conduct site visits and due diligence on current and potential grantees to prepare grant recommendations, evaluate progress and impact reports.
  • Attends various external meetings, events, presentations and conferences to represent the Corporate Philanthropy team in the community and to develop and maintain organizational visibility and accessibility.
  • Perform other duties and responsibilities as assigned.
 
Qualifications
 
Qualifications you will have…
  • 10 years of experience with leading and supporting programs, projects and/or philanthropic campaigns.
  • Bachelor’s Degree in Communications, Nonprofit or Public Administration, Business or related field.
  • Experience working with not-for-profit and/or community-based organizations.
 
Other things we seek that will set you up for success….
  • Master’s Degree Nonprofit or Public Administration, Business or related field.
  • Demonstrated knowledge and experience in planning and managing enterprise-wide programs, projects and engagement plans.
  • Project Management coursework or certification.
  • Experience in developing communications, storytelling, training and resources across multiple stakeholders and platforms.
  • Experience that includes developing and applying quantitative models to support business decision making, analyzing portfolios of work and determining how to prioritize initiatives to support business outcomes.
  • Experience with managing corporate-wide charitable projects and using related grant management databases or web-based platforms such as Benevity, Blackbaud Grantmaking, CyberGrants.
  • Must have strong creative and problem-solving skills.
  • Demonstrated skill to lead others through influence and collaboration (program/project/campaign lead).
  • Experience in developing and monitoring budgets, metrics and reports.
  • Must demonstrate effective decision making, results delivery, team building, and the ability to stay current with relevant technology and innovation.
 
You should know…
  • Candidates for this position must be legally authorized to work directly as employees for any employer in the United States without visa sponsorship.
  • This position will require working after hours during community events, emergencies or crises.
  • Why Edison?
 
The people here at Edison don't just keep the lights on. Our mission is so much bigger. We are fueling the kind of innovation that is changing an entire industry, and quite possibly the planet. You’ll have a chance to grow your career and make a difference in the world.
 
SCE serves a population of approximately 15 million via 5 million customer accounts in a 50,000-square-mile service area within Central, Coastal and Southern California. As a company, we have big dreams and we know nothing big is ever accomplished alone. Join one of the nation’s leading electric utilities in making sure California, and all of us who live here, shine bright.
 
At SCE we celebrate our differences. We are a proud Equal Opportunity Employer and will not discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, protected veteran status or any other protected status
 
To apply, visit:
 
 
 
 
 
IWG_NewLogo_CMYK_f
 
Bill Imada
Chairman and Chief Connectivity Officer
6300 Wilshire Boulevard
Suite 2150
Los Angeles, CA  90048 USA
Tel. 213.262.4090
Tel. 213.262.0911 direct
Mobile 310.691.3462
 
Follow me on Twitter @bimada
 
Friday
Jun142019

Keep your career moving forward

logo
Spacer My Account  |  Job Search  |  Manage Resumes  |  Job Alerts Spacer
grow
 
Keep your career moving forward
 
Racing Toward Diversity Magazine has a new streamlined candidate search that helps employers find skilled new hires just like you! If you’re considering a career move, now is the time to capitalize on our new and improved employer resume search interface.
 
Take the first step in landing your next great career opportunity. Upload or update your resume on Racing Toward Diversity Magazine today.
 
GET MOVING
 

 
Resume Writing Tips & Tricks
 
Spruce up your resume using these insightful articles with tons of resume writing tips straight from the professionals.
 
Resume styles 101
Learn the appropriate and preferred resume styles to help get your resume noticed.
49 Insider Secrets
Read a comprehensive list of resume writing tips and tricks straight from real hiring managers.